Book Review: Which Policy for Europe? Power and Conflict Inside the European Commission

MODUCD’s School of Politics PhD candidate, Muireann O’Dwyer, reviews: Which policy for Europe?: power and conflict inside the European Commission. Oxford University Press. This book is based on comprehensive new data from insider interviews, internal Commission documents, and a database of personal and structural Commission features. It aims to uncover the dynamics of policymaking within the Commission, and the internal negotiations which shape Commission decisions. Muireann finds the book to be a rigorous and timely contribution to research on the Commission’s role in the EU policy process.

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Europe Has More to Fear From German Nationalism than the Mediterranean Left

Regan_Aidan HDIn 2009, only 5% of Germans cited immigration as the core concern facing their country, compared to 8% in Greece and 6% in Spain. In 2014, this jumped to a staggering 37% in Germany, compared to 6% in Greece and 3% in Spain. Rising concerns about immigration now brings public opinion in Germany more in line with what is happening in the UK. The implication is that popular support for right-wing parties is likely to influence and increasingly shape the strategic position of the German government when negotiating with Greece. A comment by Dr. Aidan Regan, UCD School of Politics and Dublin European Institute (DEI).

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Report: Extracting the Political Signal from the Online Noise: A workshop on mining online content and political networks

9980232816994487415Today we had an interdisciplinary workshop bringing together scholars from political science and data analytics interested in using data-analytics methods to extract information of interest from the mass of online sources now available about politics. The workshop was co-organised by Dr. James P. Cross of the Dublin European Institute and Dr. Derek Greene of the Insight Centre for Data Analytics

In recent years there has been an explosion in the availability of political texts online. Speeches, government records, press releases and party manifestos have all made the transition from print to digital text. Complementing these traditional political texts, new forms of political texts have also emerged online on political blogs, newspaper comment sections, and microblogging platforms like twitter. These texts, the relationships between them, and the online contexts in which they are found have the potential to provide new insight into a whole host of questions that have occupied political science as a discipline. Simultaneously, the methodological challenges associated with extracting useful insights from this mass of structured and unstructured data are considerable. Methodological developments in the fields such as data analytics, natural language processing and the analysis of social networks have proven useful in this regard. This half-day workshop brought together scholars from political science and data analytics in order to explore the potential cross-overs in these fields. In doing so it aimed to open up new collaboration possibilities and demonstrate the usefulness of new approaches to analysing political text online.

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Rethinking the Minimum Wage: The Case of Seattle City Council

Nathan CohenThis blog post is the seventh in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.

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Leitrim’s Great Decline: Income, Wealth and Population

Pierce DalyThis blog post is the sixth in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.

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Public Debt: The Paradox of Free-Market Democracy?

Cormac McCarthyThis blog post is the sixth in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.

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Is Gender Equality Smart Economics?

Clodagh MoriartyThis blog post is the fifth  in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.

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The Problem of Tax Avoidance: An Examination of Germany and Switzerland

Matthias MeierThis blog post is the fourth  in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience. 

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Rethinking the International Monetary System: Do We Need a Bretton Woods II?

Alex AndersonThis blog post is the third  in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience. 

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The Politics of Debt and Distribution: Who does QE benefit?

Evan Walker

This blog post is the second in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.  

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