The Dublin European Institute – University College Dublin

International perspectives on European politics and society

Public Debt: The Paradox of Free-Market Democracy?

Cormac McCarthyThis blog post is the sixth in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.

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Is Gender Equality Smart Economics?

Clodagh MoriartyThis blog post is the fifth  in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.

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The Problem of Tax Avoidance: An Examination of Germany and Switzerland

Matthias MeierThis blog post is the fourth  in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience. 

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Rethinking the International Monetary System: Do We Need a Bretton Woods II?

Alex AndersonThis blog post is the third  in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience. 

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The Politics of Debt and Distribution: Who does QE benefit?

Evan Walker

This blog post is the second in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.  

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Taxing the Rich to Feed the Poor: What does Piketty’s Global Tax have that Pogge’s Doesn’t?

April DuffThis blog post is the first in a series of posts that come from students of our capitalism and democracy undergraduate course. As part of the course, students were asked to write about an issue pertaining to the political economy of distribution. The best blog posts have been selected to provide an opportunity to exceptional young scholars at UCD to contribute to the debate on the future of European and global economic governance, and to promote the insightful scholarship being undertaken at UCD to a wider public audience.  

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Unit Labour Costs – The History of a Dangerous Metric

Tony CaseyNominal ‘Unit Labour Cost’ (ULC) is a metric widely used throughout Eurozone policy circles to justify pro-cyclical wage restraint and austerity policies that will reverse imbalances and restore national competitiveness to the deficit periphery. What evidence is there to support this persistent Eurozone policy bias?

National Competitiveness

Surprisingly, despite the widespread use of the term, national competitiveness is an extremely elusive concept with little grounding in economic theory. Writing in 1990 whilst laying out his now famous ‘Diamond Model’ of national competitiveness Michael Porter (1990) concluded “While the notion of a competitive company is clear, the notion of a competitive nation is not.” Famously, in 1994, Paul Krugman would make the same point even more bluntly that competitiveness of nations is a “dangerous obsession” and that firms compete but “countries do not” (Krugman, 1994).

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The European Court of Justice as the Driving force Behind Integration?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOn Tuesday 14 October 2014 the European Court of Justice (CJEU) held a first hearing of the trial on the legitimacy of ECB’s Outright Monetary Transactions Programme (OMT). During this preliminary ruling procedure, initiated by the German Federal Constitutional Court (BVerfG), the CJEU began investigating a possible transgression of competences by the European Central Bank (ECB). The BVerfG did not hide the fact that they believed the ECB to be guilty. But since it related to European Law, the CJEU, as the legal guardian of the Treaties, was in charge (Höltschi, 2014).

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The Referendum has irrevocably changed the future of the UK, regardless of the outcome

Derek HutchesonBoth sides have confused the principle of independence and the policies a future Scottish Government might follow. So writes Derek Hutcheson, Senior Lecturer in Political Science at Malmö University.

The referendum in Scotland will have profound consequences  for the United Kingdom (UK), which comprises England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The question Scots were asked is ‘should Scotland be an independent country?’. For most of the campaign, it looked like the answer would be ‘no’ – but over the last couple of weeks, the gap between the two sides narrowed to almost nothing.

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The absence of national adjustment tools is the reason why Eurozone countries continue to struggle

Regan_Aidan HDjohnston2The Euro’s crisis never seems to end. Italy has re-entered recession. The French government is in turmoil over austerity. Youth unemployment is at a historic high in Spain. Increased taxes are crippling middle-income earners in Ireland. Extreme poverty is growing in Greece. Wage stagnation continues in Germany. Yet the European policy response remains the same. Reduce public spending and impose structural reforms in the Euro periphery and hope that cost competitiveness will kick start economic recovery. Any suggestion that countries are struggling to recover because they lack tools of adjustment or monetary sovereignty is politely ignored. Monetary union is not the problem. In a forthcoming research paper Dr. Alison Johnston (Oregan State University) and Dr. Aidan Regan (UCD) come to the opposite conclusion.

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